Making a Case for the Critical Capabilities of the Documentum BPM Platform

Savinay Berry

Leads product management, design and business development for EMC LEAP and EMC Documentum product lines.

If there’s one thing we know from working with our large community of customers and partners, it’s this: every organization is unique. Each one has its own set of business scenarios, relationships and complexities. As a result, each business addresses its work in its own individual, case-by-case way.

Enterprises across nearly every industry now take this case work approach to their relationships, each including multi-layered human, content and process interactions with everyone from employees to customers to regulatory agencies. As a result, organizations are looking toward more sophisticated business process management (BPM) solutions that enable case management functionality to provide holistic visibility into each distinct project.

With this continued evolution in the market, we are quite pleased to share Gartner’s evaluation of Dell EMC’s strengths in the sector within its recent report, “Critical Capabilities for BPM-Platform-Based Case Management Frameworks1, which follows on the heels of the Gartner “Magic Quadrant for BPMPlatform- Based Case Management Frameworks”2.

As indicated in the graphic below, EMC‘s score for the Investigative use case evaluated by Gartner in the Critical Capabilities report is 4.01 on a 5 point scale, placing EMC in the top quartile of the products evaluated. Our solution is driven by strong adaptive case handling, content interaction, integration and interoperability, data capture and output management, out-of-the-box components, and role appropriate analytics.

business process, BPM, ECM

Source: Gartner (November 2016)

We believe drawing on the strength of our Documentum xCP 2.2 business process management system (BPMS), we have an extensive set of Case Management Frameworks (CMFs), delivered both from ourselves and our partners. By working better together with Documentum 7.2 and components like Captiva and Document Sciences, xCP provides a robust set of content interaction capabilities. With our Documentum as a Service (DaaS) offering, this solution can be deployed as a managed service, providing even greater flexibility. Dell EMC also certifies all solutions in the Solution Catalog to ensure the highest quality for our customers.

Further, the Gartner MQ report provides a mention of our LEAP Courier SaaS-based offering, and we’re proud that its perception in the industry is living up to and exceeding expectations. Courier offers a new paradigm for businesses that rely on document exchange because, instead of dumping a bunch of files into the cloud as some solutions do, Courier provides a configurable structure that enables visibility, tracking, versioning, and true communication about when and how files are exchanged on a case by case basis.

We are pleased with the evaluations we received in Gartner’s research, but one additional conclusion they have made might make us the proudest. In the report, Gartner also includes feedback from EMC customers who had been surveyed. It’s truly rewarding to all of us to read this finding, because, on a case-by-case basis, our goal is, and will continue to be, to meet our customers’ needs in an unprecedented way.

1 Gartner Critical Capabilities for BPM-Platform-Based Case Management Frameworks, Rob Dunie, Janelle B. Hill, November 3, 2016

2 Gartner Magic Quadrant for BPM-Platform-Based Case Management Frameworks, Rob Dunie, Janelle B. Hill, October 24, 2016

Oil & Gas — It’s your chance to reinvent

Martin Richards

EMC Corporation’s Enterprise Content Division Senior Director of Energy Industry Solutions. Follow @MartinR_Eng

Cost-cutting throughout the oil & gas sector has triggered some 350,000 US layoffs which has far-reaching implications for content management initiatives. Many don’t realize is there is an opportunity to reinvent the business to be stronger when crude prices rebound. One sensible road forward is to look at the extended digital enterprise model, and how that vision can be inspirational in today’s cost-conscious market environment. Here are three areas to consider.Cost cutting, Oil & Gas,

Digitize for Knowledge Retention

First let’s address a tactical item, knowledge retention. Veteran workers who are no longer employed cannot readily tell colleagues how to fix a valve or where gas line maps are filed. Short term, it’s important to move documents into a centralized archive, as well as rapidly capture and ingest at-risk content areas (such as a subsidiary’s maintenance documentation).

As an example, although one Oil & Gas operator bought a set of North Sea offshore assets from a global major, it didn’t consider the crews maintaining the plant pumps. That maintenance knowledge was held by specialized contractors and outside the acquired entity’s documentation set. Whether you are planning to sell or hoping to buy, streamlining your documentation makes sense in improving your business.

Long-term, it should become clear that purely paper-driven solutions for knowledge retention are not feasible. While it might take a bit of investment now, having critical documentation digital, accessible, and portable will be a basic requirement for the extended digital enterprise model. It will no longer be acceptable to misfile paper drawings or take months to onboard supporting help, as digital transformation expedites timeframes and shares content differently.

Staff for the Extended Enterprise

Second, and more strategically, is a rare chance to consider new business models and organizational approaches to restaffing your business later. Currently the industry is heavily dependent upon contractors, who share accountability and significant responsibilities to deliver new builds or manage aging assets.

Moving forward, viewing the industry in light of an extended enterprise model means an opportunity to build smaller organizations and increase partnerships. While outsourcing might never reach the levels of the automotive industry, there is opportunity to reshape. For companies who identify core competencies, such as extraction, any auxiliary services could be structured as outsourced roles rather than as employee positions.

This builds more flexibility into handling future downturns. For any manager who has had to personally let staff go, it could be priceless to avoid the pain of job cuts (not to mention the pain for loyal employees losing their jobs).

Oil & GasThink Globally, Act Locally

New hire staffing can also be considered differently if you approach the downturn as a chance to build out your future extended digital enterprise. Complex work, with significant health and safety considerations, will always still have to be completed. This raises several actionable areas.

First, without veterans to learn from, the enterprise reliance upon content management will be all the more important. Beyond keeping equipment running safely, having your content available digitally will enable faster onboarding and time-to-productivity – at least for the humans you hire, if not the robots.

Second, your new hires may expect mobile access to tools, modern applications, and a highly collaborative style of getting work done. For those of you still clinging to paper, it will be difficult to attract the best and the brightest. Consider as well where you can use automated tools that reduce excessive human overhead, and keep new hires in roles needing critical thinking or analysis.

Third, and perhaps more important as you consider the industry’s place within local communities and the global stage, is your ability to improve environmental impact metrics. For many new hires, green causes are driving their interest in working for energy companies like solar or wind. Finding ways today to start reducing your company’s environmental impact (no more paper, for example), and better serve your local communities will help with recruiting.

Time to Reinvent

In summary, cost-cutting can only go so far, and now is the time to reinvent. Start with low hanging fruit like organizing and digitizing critical content. Then map plans for a digital extended enterprise that works more efficiently, perhaps with a smaller employee footprint, but a greater presence through modern connected tools and content.

The Season of Thanks

Rohit Ghai

President of the Enterprise Content Division at Dell EMC. Follow @rohit_ghai

Thanksgiving is the occasion that always signifies the beginning of the holiday season in some regions of the world including here in the US. I think it’s very appropriate that the first thing on which we focus as we enter into the holidays is being thankful. Thankfulness is a globally relevant idea. It engenders grace, humility and reminds us to not take all our blessings for granted amidst our fast paced business lives.

While this is a business conversation, first and foremost we must be thankful to our families thankful
and friends who provide the very foundation on which our business lives rest. We must thank them for their generosity with our time that we devote to our work lives.

Today, I am also thankful for the fantastic and unique road that we with the Enterprise Content Division (ECD) have traveled over the past year. When we began 2016, few people could have anticipated what the future had in store for our organization. But in so many ways, the journey we have taken together has brought us closer and made us stronger both as a team and an organization.

So, to start the holiday season, and on behalf of our leadership team, I’d like take a moment to express thanks for the following:

• First, of course, we are extremely thankful for our team. Time and again through the year’s transformation, we’ve received glowing compliments about our tenacity, industry knowledge, innovative mindset and customer focus. These are all things that allow us to feel very confident about our future together in seasons to come.

• We are thankful for our partner community. Our partners have not only joined with us in a renewed commitment to delivering superior results to our customers, but have also maintained an focused commitment to providing a superior customer experience all along the digital transformation journey.

• We are thankful for our customers. They have been our thought partners and have continued to challenge us to get better. They have also been able to see beyond market noise and have maintained faith that ECD always has and will continue to provide the solutions that will best support their digital transformation and content management goals, both now and into the future.

• We are thankful for those who joined us at our Las Vegas and Barcelona Momentum events and Customer.NEXT roadshows. The support and collaboration that so many of you brought back to us was great inspiration and confirmation of our efforts to provide the best user experience in the industry.

I’d like to wish you all the happiest of Thanksgivings, as well as a holiday season that is as full of blessings as the ones for which we are so grateful.

Momentum Barcelona: Where a Spark Becomes a Fire

Chris McLaughlin

Chief Marketing Officer, Enterprise Content Division. Follow @cc_mclaughlin

Momentum Barcelona,

After every Momentum, I am given the unenviable task of trying to recapture each amazing iteration of this event in vivid detail, to effectively recount the keynotes, the various breakout sessions, and all of the fun and community that make Momentum such an amazing event for our customers, our partners and, yes, our employees. So, while it may be nearly impossible, let me take a moment to relive Momentum Barcelona and to celebrate the return of this great event to Europe.

For those of you that were unable to join us for Momentum Europe, I’m truly sorry you weren’t able to experience the incredible atmosphere and beautiful location that is Barcelona. What an incredible city in which to host our Momentum Conference, full of history, life, vitality and, of course, never-ending fun. I can’t think of a better backdrop for an event that celebrates our customers and their successes with our technology.

And, to the more than 800 registered attendees and, in particular, our customer and partners, I want to simply say thank you for sharing the experience with us and helping to make it an event that practically defies description.

Before I get into the highlights of the conference, I also wanted to share with you an observation that our President, Rohit Gsparks, Momentum Barcelona, hai, and one of our partners from Informed Consulting made together during one of the sessions this past week. The two shared a view that the team from the Enterprise Content Division has long had an undeniable spark, a spark that seems to burn even brighter during important times like Momentum, and in particular, Momentum Europe.

You see, at events like Momentum or our Customer.NEXT roadshows, we are at our best, surrounded by the customers and partners that have made ECD great. We are with our “community.” Better yet, we are amongst friends. During these moments, this ECD community has achieved incredible success, building upon the present and always looking forward to the future. The reason is clear: it’s because each of us – customer, partner and employee – shares a common goal, as well as the commitment to see one another succeed, to realize the incredible value that organizations can achieve working with our technology. This is the spark we experienced this week, one that has continued to burn brightly through all of the years and across every Momentum.

And, as we look toward the end of a very eventful year, we’re also looking toward the amazing opportunities that lie before us to fan this flame into an even bigger blaze in the years to come. Perhaps never before has the name Momentum been more appropriate for our conference, or for our organization. This is evidenced by all of the activities and announcements that accompanied this year’s Momentum Europe.

As you likely know, at ECD, we are focused on digital transformation and enabling our customers to achieve true competitive advantage in this digital age. You probably also know that much of the rest of the industry has recognized our vision and is now beginning to share our understanding of the importance of enabling transformation. However, unlike many others in the market, ECD has continually delivered on its promise of providing a complete content strategy and set of solutions that will enable our customers to achieve their transformational goals.

At Momentum Barcelona, we launched groundbreaking new solutions, including new LEAP apps and the LEAP Platform, as well as the next release of InfoArchive, InfoArchive 4.2, which brings exciting new capabilities for our Financial Services customers (on the heels of the recently announced InfoArchive 4.1/Clinical Archiving 2.0). We also provided a number of exciting updates to our Documentum products that make them easier than ever before to deploy, upgrade and manage in hybrid environments. Finally, we shared updates on a few of our industry solutions, designed to meet specific vertical needs, including new features in the Dell EMC Documentum Asset Operations 2.1 that offer compelling opportunities for the Energy and Engineering industries and Dell EMC Documentum Life Sciences Suite 4.2 , which now provides support for medical device documentation, as well as enhanced features for pharmaceutical organizations.

And this is really just the beginning. Momentum Barcelona 2016 also featured three entertaining keynotes, starting with the opening keynote with Rohit, Muhi Mazjoub from OpenText, and three customers who shared how our products are enabling their digital transformation. Our second keynote included two analysts from IDC, Roberta Bigliani and Max Claps, and focused on key trends in Digital Transformation. And the climactic, closing keynote featured Rohit and noted futurist, Beau Lotto, who offered an exciting vision of things to come.

Other highlights of Momentum Barcelona included:

  • 750+ Labs completed, with customers working directly with our technology
  • 748 #MMTM16 mentions
  • 439 Momentum app downloads
  • 300 attendees at our Momentum Partner Summit
  • 200 Hack-a-thon participants
  • 200 Partner Summit attendees
  • 146 trees planted
  • 87 LEAP personality quizzes completed
  • 65 hours of Product & Industry sessions
  • 54 1:1 meetings with media and analysts
  • 33 Life Sciences user group attendees
  • 30 Genius Lab sessions with our Professional Services team
  • 26 customers speaking in sessions
  • 25 partner sponsors
  • 9 Mo & Tim videos recorded
  • 8 sessions dedicated to LEAP
  • 6 partner innovation award winners
  • 1 President’s Award winner for Customer Satisfaction
  • And, just so you don’t get the impression that we were all business, one surreal party. Perhaps I’ll just leave it at that, but if we ever see each other in person, you can ask me privately for more details.

But, for those of you who may already know those details, our valued customers and partners, thank you again for being with us at Momentum Barcelona. If we missed you this time, we sincerely hope to see you at one of our future events. It’s a very exciting time for ECD and we can’t wait to share it with you. The spark has ignited, the flame is growing higher, and there is room around the fire for everyone.

Congratulations and thank you, everyone, for a fantastic Momentum 2016 in Barcelona!

A Digital Government Blueprint in the Era of Connected Cities

Karim Rizkallah

Regional Presales Manager, Middle East and Africa at Dell EMC Enterprise Content Division. @karimrizkallah at Dell EMC Enterprise Content Division

Latest posts by Karim Rizkallah (see all)

Cities across the globe are adopting new digital technologies to improve the lifestyle of its citizens. Dubbed as Smart Cities or Connected Cities, places like London, Seoul, New York and Dubai are increasingly making use of digital platforms like IoT, Robotics, Drones and 3D Printing to break the norms of services offered to their constituents. These technologies are being used for autonomous street lighting reacting to changing weather conditions; for search and rescue operations in the event of a disaster; dispatching medical supplies for the injured in remote locations and 3D printed buildings.

Precocious as they may be, a closer look will unveil that cities are no stranger to thedigital government challenges faced by many others in Europe and the rest of the world. Starting with an aging population that is draining budgets and resources; a decaying infrastructure in need of continuous maintenance; a growing immigration crisis; not to mention economic stagnation and escalating unemployment rates.

Also to note is that these smart city programs are seldom a part of a broader all encompassing Digital Transformation action plan on the Federal or Local Government level. Some of them are running side by side country-wide modernization efforts, but the connections are loose. And that is unfortunate because by definition citizen services should be inclusive and oblivious to class and location.

This leaves way to a Digital Government Agenda that should be followed to create public value for the greater population; taking into consideration that the cornerstones of a Digital Strategy have to be the Citizen, his Data and the Services to be offered to him. The aspiration of this agenda will ultimately be to move from analog processes that come with long service delivery times; lowering TCOs of current systems to give way to new innovative solutions and balancing between information transparency and privacy to cater for Open Data initiatives.

To that end, there have been many guidelines to which strategies should be opted for on the journey towards Digital Transformation. Four recommendations are presented here into what I call the Digital Government Blueprint. These focus on the essential ideas without which a Digital Government Strategy is not complete.

Information is key to Better Decision Making

Governments that build a data strategy covering various angles of the citizen’s daily life, will be able to aggregate enough of it to be able to leverage Analytics to unlock significant decision making power. Adjacent to that, with the proliferation of social, new data types are emerging that need to be managed to better understand citizen expectations. Aggregating all these data types and more will empower governments to rethink their policies in a way that addresses citizens’ needs first and foremost. What this also provides is an opportunity to uncover areas of fraud, waste and misappropriation of budgets.

Building a Citizen-Centric Digital Platform

Transforming processes into a “Citizen-Centric” service model will render them more effective as services are redesigned from a citizen perspective. By adopting mobile platforms and turning towards an Open Data model, governments are able to score points in accessibility and openness. These are heightened even more when citizen engagement is undertaken, creating an opportunity to gain insights on service level acceptance; establishing trial programs for service adoption and launching new “Digital First” services that citizens need and will embrace.

Adopting a Digital-by-Default Service Delivery Strategy

Mobile-ready, always-on Digital Services designed with context and convenience in mind will promote value for money to encourage citizens to follow the path of a more intuitive service delivery approach. Public sector agencies should therefore start to transition existing services and paper-based processes to a Digital Platform and develop these services in partnership with citizen representatives, private sector and NGOs to ensure inclusiveness and broad reach. However, an integral part of successful service delivery is having a workforce that is skilled in the use of digital technologies; which imposes a need for updated training programs and incentive schemes. Finally, where appropriate, the implementation of these Digital Services should be in a way where data can be made openly available in support of a government’s initiatives around Open Data and of citizens’ demands of transparency reports on government effectiveness.

Governance Framework to Optimize Information Value

As efforts are exerted to avail more information for public use, data governance challenges arise. As Open Data models begin to form, new data sets get created to be used by local governments and the private sector for new apps and services. This presents an opportunity to monetize this data; but again not on the expense of a lack of governance. It is therefore crucial that governments are able to strike a balance between trust/transparency from one side and privacy/security from the other. Creating a Citizen Digital Identity can be the first step towards achieving this. Personalized access, authentication and monitoring will allow citizens to have consent on what data can be shared. This will also assist Federal Governments in creating data security standards that can be tailored by local agencies according to the needs of their constituents.

So go back to your organization, what does Digital Transformation mean to you? And how will you take the first steps? We know that governments around the globe have different priorities based on their citizens’ needs; does this blueprint allow you to meet these priorities? Please share your views.

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